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Ilana

I'm not convinced by your argument that 'LinkedIn is MySpace for grown-ups' by this blog entry I'm afraid.

I'm not being argumentative, but by stating that Linkedin needs to let go in order to work on the same sort of level as MySpace, you're contradicting yourself.

I do agree that Linkedin does work as an anchor to online identity - that for professionals it's a great way to lay claim to what kind of person you are (one that's 'down with web 2.0' for example), and that there's no better way to define yourself than to say what other people you like and get on with.

But, as you summarise, Linkedin will not work unless people can give themselves more to the virtual postcard that is the internet, and can interact more freely. Which is why I rate SoFlow (and to a lesser extent, the bizniz people who make up eCademy) - it's proper social networking, with all the embarrassing former conversations from months ago that you wish you'd done by email/private message after all.

One big difference between MySpace and Linkedin is that Linkedin is purely for professionals - no record labels are vying for marketing space on there. And maybe that's the problem. If I'm Ilana Fox on Linkedin (which I am, I think), then I want to be careful about what I write and how I interact with people. But if I'm Foxy Sparkle on MySpace (which I am not, but thanks for editing my name by the way!) I can say whatever the fuck I want and no harm done. So it's about the type of reputation you build, and are aiming to build. If I registered Foxy Sparkle on Linkedin people would think me a porn star.

And that, my one-fingered-typing-friend, is the main reason why Linkedin will never be a MySpace. It's restrictive in what it can be, and what it can allow it's users to be. People will never interact properly on it because who wants their business emails (as opposed to 'I fancy you/want to go to this gig/I look so fat today' MySpace style mails) in the public domain? There's some statistic somewhere that claims teenagers who use MySpace no longer use emails - and I believe this. Emails just don't give the kids the American-style get-it-off-yer-chest airing they crave.

Linkedin is not a bad thing, but it's definitely a niche thing that people will grow tired of once they've made all the contacts they wish to and exhausted all conversation that they're willing to have in such an open space.

Reg Crandall

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Sameer

I wonder what the ratio of Unique Vistors : Conversationalists (contributors) is for any given myspace page. I've visited many a myspace and left a comment on maybe 2 or 3. I visited for the content, not the conversation. Perhaps I'm a bit of a dinosaur.

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